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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of Yield and physiological responses of field-grown soybeans to elevated night temperatures found in the catalog.

Yield and physiological responses of field-grown soybeans to elevated night temperatures

Majid Seddigh

Yield and physiological responses of field-grown soybeans to elevated night temperatures

by Majid Seddigh

  • 114 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soybean.,
  • Plants, Effect of temperature on.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Majid Seddigh.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[11], 97 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages97
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14243911M

    A field experiment on soybeans demonstrated that considerable variation in leaf temperature relative to air temperature occurred, leading to evaporative gradients differing substantially from VPD. Thus, transpiration is decreased by stomatal closure at high VPD, but to compensate, transpiration is somewhat increased due to higher leaf temperatures. Recent yield contests in some states show that a handful of farmers are coming close to routinely raising bu.-or-better soybeans in consecutive years. If these farmers can find a way to achieve ultra-high soybeans yields year-in and year-out, you can, too.

    Recently, a study conducted with 18 soybean cultivars (II, III, IV soybean groups) conducted in several years repeated with ppm of CO 2, found average responses of 22% increase in the aerial biomass and only 9% in the yield of the seed, when grown in the appropriate growing season, and average temperatures of the growing season varying. Yield data indicate that BSR reduced soybean yield primarily by reducing seed number and secondarily by reducing seed weight (Dunleavy and Weber , Mengistu et al. , Weber et al. ), possibly through premature ripening (Chamberlain and McAlister ). However, physiological responses of the soybean plant to BSR disease have not.

      Elevated temperatures at the R5 growth stage (beginning seed fill), has the greatest negative impact on soybean yield. During seed fill, daytime temperatures greater than 85 degrees can cause decreased soybean weight while temperatures . • Soybean planting dates have large window, depends the cultivars and maturity groups. Therefore, higher temperatures during flowering and early-pod-filling stages may impact yield potential of soybean crop in US-Midsouth. • High Temperature during soybean seed development affects soybean yield and seed composition (Wilson, ).


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Yield and physiological responses of field-grown soybeans to elevated night temperatures by Majid Seddigh Download PDF EPUB FB2

Physiological Responses of Field‐Grown Soybean Leaves to Increased Reproductive Load Induced by Elevated Night Temperatures 1. assimilate demand was brought about by elevating the night temperature from 2 weeks after crop emergence until physiological maturity.

Mean minimum night temperature treatments included check (uncontrolled, ca. 10 Cited by: Yield and physiological responses of field-grown soybeans to elevated night temperaturesAuthor: Majid Seddigh. Physiological Responses of Field-Grown Soybean Leaves to Increased Reproductive Load Induced by Elevated Night Temperatures Author: Seddigh, Majid, Jolliff, Gary D.

Source: Crop science v no.5 pp. ISSN: X Subject: plant physiology, plant biochemistry Abstract:Cited by:   Elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration ([CO 2]) generally enhances C 3 plant productivity, whereas acute heat stress, which occurs during heat waves, generally elicits the opposite response.

However, little is known about the interaction of these two variables, especially during key reproductive phases in important temperate food crops, such as soybean (Glycine max).Cited by: 6. responses of two important C3 crops, rice (Oryza sativa L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.), to elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] and high temperatures.

These crops show interesting differences in how their photosynthetic processes adapt to rising CO2 and temperature. INTRODUCTION Worldwide concern continues to grow over the increase of greenhouse gases. Response of soybean yield components and allocation of dry matter to increased Although the effects of high temperatures and [CO 2] day/night temperatures of.

The same procedure was used by Koti et al. () to show the response of enhanced ultraviolet‐B radiation on soybean pollen, with germination ranging from 72 to 92% among treatments. Salem et al. () observed PG ranging from 70 to 93% in a study screening 44 soybean genotypes for PG under high temperature.

Yield and yield component responses to elevated air temperatures. Pod number and seed number per pot increased with temperatures elevation up to °C above AT treatment, and then decreased with further temperature elevation (Table 3). Seed number is determined by the number of pods and the number of seeds per pod.

Increased flowering and pod. The line of G4 had the largest seed size, while the G12 line had the smallest seed size (Figure 5). Differences (a) (b) Figure 5. Means of weight of seeds and seed yield of twelve soybean.

Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Enrei) plants were grown in pots (L volume) placed in a greenhouse with the time when the first flower opened, pots were transferred to growth chambers with natural lighting under day temperature of 30°C and night temperatures of 20, 25 or 30°C.

1. Introduction. Cultivar selection is an important way to increase crop yield (Ustun et al., ).In the north central region of the USA, the yield increase attributed to soybean breeding was between 10 and 20 kg ha −1 per year from to in maturity groups 00 through IV (Specht and Williams, ).A similar trend was found in the mid-southern region of the USA.

grain yield and biomass of field-grown crops of wheat. Pan D () Soybean responses to elevated temperature and doubled CO 2 Rice yields decline with higher night temperatures from. This paper describes the effects of higher day and night temperatures on crop growth and yield.

dryland crops may synthesize and accumulate substantial levels of heat shock proteins in response to elevated leaf temperatures. 89, 75, 60, 58 and 21 kDa. In a similar experiment with field-grown soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.

Soil moisture deficits and low air temperatures frequently result in crop yield losses in the United States. Understanding how older and newer soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars differ in phenological development under various environmental conditions may aid in the selection of higher-yielding cultivars and in the development of simulation models for field-grown soybean.

Pod yield, the number of flowers produced, and proportion of flowers that were fertilized and retained, were reduced by high temperatures in groundnut (Prasad et al., ).

Pollen abnormalities were observed in soybean (Koti et al., ), snap bean (Suzuki et al., ), and common bean grown in high temperatures (Porch and Jahn, ). Project Methods Three approaches to this research have been identified: (1) An exploratory approach to improve the understanding and description of nitrogen accumulation and use by crops.

(2) An applications approach to analyze the constraints on crop yield as a result of environmental stresses including water deficit, temperature, and photoperiod. Fromwe have conducted trials with the same set of old to newer soybean cultivars to determine the impact of plant breeding on seed yield, physiological and agronomic characteristics, and seed composition.

Sinceglobal atmospheric [CO2] increased by 47 ppm. The objective of our current analysis with this data set was to determine if there were changes in soybean seed yield, quality. Correlation between Grain Yield and Seed Number near Whiting, y = x + R2 = 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 0 Seed number (# per m2) Yield.

AN ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS OF Majid Seddigh for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Crop Science presented on Ap Title: Yield and Physiological Responses of Field-Grown Soybean to Elevated Night Temperatures Redacted for privacy Abstract approved.

In Lotus creticus elevated night temperatures caused a greater reduction in leaf water potential in water-stressed as compared to well-watered plants. In sugarcane, leaf water potential and its components were changed upon exposure to heat stress even though the soil water supply and relative humidity conditions were optimal, implying an.

The yield loss will be directly proportional to the plants' physiological growth stage. Soybean plants that are very near the point of physiological maturity can be expected to weather the freeze with little impact on yield.

However, soybean fields that are only at R6 (full seed) with all green leaves will experience significant yield losses.Grain yield and the mean air temperature (27–32 °C) for 20 days after heading time showed an upward convexity and grain yield declined steeply when the mean temperature exceeded 28 °C (Oh-e et al., ).

In day/night temperature above 28/21 °C, grain yields decline by an average of approximately 10% per 1 °C (Baker and Allen, b).Bysoybean (Glycine max) will grow in an atmosphere with a 50% higher carbon dioxide concentration ([CO 2]) (Prentice et al., ).As the world's most widely grown seed legume, the physiological responses of soybean to elevated CO 2 have been well characterized.

Elevated [CO 2] increases carbon (C) uptake, foliar carbohydrate content, plant growth, and yield, while decreasing .